Creative. Entrepreneurial. Optimistic.

Creativity, an entrepreneurial spirit and optimism might well be the key to unlocking the secrets to effective leadership.

Spillane and Orlina (2005) state that ‘leadership is not the actions of the leaders per se but the interactions between leaders and other agents’. The digital age is by nature collaborative, a word often linked to creative practice. With creative flare and an unwilling sense of optimism about what we can achieve together, successful CEO’s build communities set on solving some of our toughest problems.

Take Alischa Ross, CEO of Youth Empowerment Against HIV/AIDS (YEAH). The organisations social campaign Red Aware has over 5,500 followers, most of whom are young people set on advocating safe sex and eradicating HIV. Much of YEAH’s work is about empowerment, engagement and ‘edu-tainment’. As Alischa innovates, “Sometimes you’ve got to do things differently to make people stop what they’re doing and really take notice!”

Moos (2010) argues effective leaders need to be ‘pointing out the difference between what is and what should be’ but notes it is not necessarily the role of these leaders to minimise the difference.

Jack Manning Bancroft is the CEO and Founder of AIME. At 19, whilst completing his studies, Jack started the AIME program with 25 Indigenous kids in Redfern. Currently AIME works with over 3,500 Indigenous high school students and 1,250 university student acting as mentors across Australia. The aim is to ensure Indigenous kids have the opportunity to finish school at the same rate as every Australian child. Jack is one of Australia’s youngest CEOs leading a team of nearly 100 staff across the country. In 2013, AIME was voted 26th in BRW’s Best Places to Work. And there is no doubt why!

Wheatley and Frieze (2010) advocate for ‘leaders as hosts’ rather than ‘hero’s’, inferring, ‘You’re playing the hero if you believe that you can save the situation, the person, the world.’

 “Leaders as hosts trust 
that
 people
 are 
willing 
to 
contribute,
 and 
that 
most
 people
 yearn 
to 
find 
meaning 
and
 possibility 
in 
their 
lives 
and 
work. …
 These 
leaders
 know 
that
 hosting 
others
 is 
the
 only
 way 
to 
get 
complex,
 intractable 
problems 
solved.”

Alischa Ross and Jack Manning Bancroft are both the hero and the host. They are CEO’s who aim to solve the big problems, and who do so with creativity and tireless passion. They are the ones who took a risk and went on to create a worthy organisation our of nothing but sheer optimism and an entrepreneurial spirit.

References:

Moos, L. (2010) ‘From successful school leadership towards distributed leadership’ Preedy, Bennett and Wise (2012) Educational Leadership: Context, Strategy and Collaboration, The Open University, UK

Spillane , J.P and Orlina, E.C. (2005), Investigating leadership practice: exploring the entitlements of taking a distributed perspective, Paper presented at the AERA Annual Meeting, Montreal

Wheatley, Margaret with Frieze, Debbie (2010) Leadership
 in 
the 
Age 
of Complexity: 
From 
Hero 
to Host.Published 
in 
Resurgence
 Magazine,
Winter
 2011



Comments are closed.